Brain Biology with Ryan Goodwin, LifeVantage Chief Marketing Officer, Brian Dixon, PhD, SVP of Research and Development, and Jesse Allen, VP of Marketing and Communications. In today’s episode, we’re talking about the importance of product quality with our special guest, Gordon Fralick, VP of Quality Assurance and Regulatory Affairs.

You’ve seen all the science and studies we have with our LifeVantage products, but now, it’s time to find out about the quality and the integrity of our products based on the diligence that our Quality Assurance and Regulatory Affairs department puts into the entire process. Learn more about how we deliver the best LifeVantage product possible to our customers including product quality, safety, individual raw materials, and supply chain.

Flip the “Quality” Switch: The Importance of Product Quality Audio Transcript

Jesse Allen:

All right. Welcome, guys. Welcome to Flip the Switch. Well, everybody that’s listening, they know my voice. Jesse Allen, Vice President of Marketing with LifeVantage. And Ryan Goodwin, you want to say hello?

Ryan Goodwin:

Hello, everybody.

Jesse Allen:

Ryan. You guys know Ryan, our CMO here at LifeVantage. And we have with us Gordon. Introduce yourself. Tell us who you are; name, title, and what you do here at LifeVantage. Primarily the listeners, Gordon, just so you’re aware, are distributors and then some of our customers that are interested in LiveVantage, interested in our product and what we’re doing. Introduce yourself, and then we’re going to jump into this topic around product and product quality and safety. But I think when you introduce yourself, that’ll let everybody know what we’re about to talk about.

Gordon Fralick:

Okay, thank you. I’m Gordon Fralick. I am the Vice President of Quality Assurance and Regulatory Affairs. I am responsible for-

Ryan Goodwin:

That sounds very official.

Gordon Fralick:

Oh, I have the longest title in the entire company.

Ryan Goodwin:

I think it’s the regulatory part that sounds official.

Jesse Allen:

Well, it’s affairs.

Ryan Goodwin:

Right.

Jesse Allen:

I mean, he’s in charge of some serious affairs.

Gordon Fralick:

Right, right. Yeah. And if anybody’s been to Elite Academy and been to the Pro Tandem booth, they have met me and probably shook hands with me and probably had discussions.

Jesse Allen:

We’ll find a photo.

Ryan Goodwin:

And run their fingers through your beard.

Gordon Fralick:

Okay.

Jesse Allen:

Yeah, because we’re not doing a video this time, so we’re going to find a photo and make sure that they know exactly who’s talking to them today.

Gordon Fralick:

I have the beard though. You’ve got to get the beard. No shave November turned into December, January, February, now March.

Jesse Allen:

Just keep rocking it.

Gordon Fralick:

Right.

Jesse Allen:

Perfect, perfect. Well, thanks for joining us today. This is a little bit, for lack of a better word, opportunistic. We jumped on this pretty quick. Ryan and I were on a call yesterday with some of our distributors and we were talking product, product quality, how we ensure the quality and the safety of the product. It felt like the opportune time to bring you in and talk a little bit. And as we’ve been talking just now, you were going through really what you do and what your team does to ensure that we’re delivering the best possible product to our customers that we can, and it’s really pretty fascinating. Take us through what you were talking about just now, through the supply chain and everything that we have going on all the way back to the individual raw materials, because it’s pretty fascinating. Ryan and I are going to jump in with questions as you’re going and dig into this a little bit. But what we really want to do is paint a very clear picture for those that are listening that they one, walk away with confidence of the nature of our product, both from… They know the efficacious side of it. They’ve seen all the studies and everything that we have with our product, but maybe we can paint a picture of just the quality and the integrity of the product based on the diligence that you and your team put into the entire process.

Gordon Fralick:

Okay. Well, I think I want to start at the end, the very end of the process, and that involves physical product. We receive in quality assurance all of the product that LifeVantage makes, and before we release it, in order to go for consumption, we physically inspect it. We make sure it’s the right product. We make sure that everything is clear, that the label is good, that the lot code is there, the expiration is there. We open it up. We make sure there’s 30 tablets. We’re physically examining this finished product before it goes out. In addition to that, there is this whole barrage of documentation that’s all of these tests that are involving different aspects of product; microbiology, pesticides, herbicides, heavy metal, a lot of efficacy testing, HPLC and GC to make sure that the herbs are there, that the vitamins are there, and we gather all of these documents. We go through them. We make sure we have them all. We make sure that all the tests comply with our specifications, and then we hit this button that says release the product.

Jesse Allen:

Release the product!

Gordon Fralick:

Release the product!

Ryan Goodwin:

That’s a cool button. I knew it was official.

Gordon Fralick:

Yep. And that is the very end of the process and there’s a lot that goes before that, because we’re looking at a document. We’re looking at a Certificate of Analysis from a laboratory. Well, the product had to be sent to a laboratory in order to be tested, and before that it had to be made, it had to be processed, all the materials had to come together. The job of quality assurance ultimately is to make sure the product is safe and effective. That’s everything that we do is to make sure that the product is safe and effective. And if I had to boil it all down, there are really two aspects. One is through this extensive testing that I’ve started talking about, and assuring through actual test and documentation, the things that we talk about. And the other thing is auditing, and auditing is really just going somewhere and checking a place out.

Gordon Fralick:

We have a very extensive auditing system. Quality assurance and operations work hand in hand, and we go to laboratories, we go to warehouses, we go to contract manufacturers, we go to raw material providers, and-

Ryan Goodwin:

You’re going to the farm?

Gordon Fralick:

Yes. That’s a tricky question, because oftentimes the farm is a long ways away, and maybe there are dozens and dozens of mom and pop farms-

Ryan Goodwin:

Ah, got you. That all lead up to where the raw material is actually produced.

Gordon Fralick:

Yes. That’s a good question though, because part of auditing international raw material manufacturers is making sure that they have processes in place for knowing the farmers, the farms, the land that things are grown on, even the types of seeds that are coming from, and making sure that there are good practices for the individual farmers.

Jesse Allen:

Give us a size of scope as you’re talking about this. And I think we’re primarily talking about Protandim Nrf2 Synergizer, but if we’re looking at just that product alone, when you’re looking at all the raw materials, the contract manufacturers, even packaging, ultimately you’ve got to ensure the quality of all of that.

Gordon Fralick:

Yes.

Jesse Allen:

What is the scope? How many different people, organizations are involved in the manufacturing of essentially that single tablet?

Gordon Fralick:

Can I just say huge to answer that question? [crosstalk 00:07:24]. It’s huge!

Ryan Goodwin:

If you could answer right off with a definite number, I would be impressed.

Jesse Allen:

Yeah, and it doesn’t have to be a definite number, but give us an idea.

Gordon Fralick:

Okay.

Jesse Allen:

Yeah, just give us a rough idea.

Gordon Fralick:

We are a global environment and things come from everywhere. That’s the world we live in. If you think about plants, there are plants that grow in certain regions because that’s where they’re indigenous. We go all over the world in order to find and acquire the materials that get used in our products. To give you an idea of the scope, there are countless farms throughout the world that grow crops that are consumed as foods, as dietary supplements, and they are processed and sometimes they’re extracted, which means a concentration process which is a different facility. And you’re talking about going from good farming practices to good manufacturing practices in a more and more controlled environment as you are traveling up this food chain.

Gordon Fralick:

There are facilities throughout the world that will dry and mill and extract and provide those materials. There are manufacturers who will take all of these materials, weigh them carefully out, blend them together, put them into capsules or tablets, put them into bottles, package them, warehouses, laboratories for testing, and then through distribution. It’s difficult to answer if you’re asking me the scope, because you’re really talking about hundreds of different companies and entities, and probably thousands of different people involved.

Jesse Allen:

And ultimately, you’ve got to ensure that they’re all doing it the right way.

Gordon Fralick:

Yes.

Jesse Allen:

They’re following whatever protocol we’ve put in place or the industry has put in place, and we’re ensuring that they’re all doing it correctly and as we’ve agreed upon, right?

Gordon Fralick:

Yeah.

Ryan Goodwin:

I’d like to imagine that they’re all doing it with a whole lot of love.

Gordon Fralick:

Absolutely a whole lot of love.

Jesse Allen:

You know, it’s fascinating. As you’re sitting here talking about it, I’m just kind of in my mind thinking it would be pretty amazing-

Gordon Fralick:

And I’m just kind of in my mind thinking it would be pretty amazing or remarkable just to put a pencil to all of this and how many people really are involved. But the fact that a single bottle of Protandim Nrf2 Synergizer, how many people it actually supports around the world from a financial standpoint, right? We typically think in the mindset from a distributor and a consumer, the impact on those two individuals. But really, we’re impacting the lives of so many people around the globe with that single product.

Jesse Allen:

Yeah. Absolutely.

Gordon Fralick:

That’s really…

Ryan Goodwin:

Literally, hundreds of thousands.

Jesse Allen:

Yeah. That’s really, really, really very cool.

Jesse Allen:

Okay, so if we go back to, you mentioned a minute ago, you’re traveling overseas. You have to travel to China and to India. And I think that’s more on the raw materials side of things where you’re auditing and inspecting those facilities, there, ensuring that they’re meeting protocol. You walked through that a little bit a minute ago. Not while we’ve been recording, but before the recording you were telling us kind of the inspection that you have to do on the floor if you will, as they’re working. Walk through that a little bit. What are you looking for? What are you watching? What are you paying attention to?

Gordon Fralick:

How far back? Are you talking like a raw material facility?

Jesse Allen:

Just take us raw materials.

Ryan Goodwin:

Yeah. Either raw material or even the manufacturer.

Gordon Fralick:

Okay. Okay. There are going to be a lot of similarities between the two of those. So if you go to, actually, either one, a raw material facility where they’re processing raw materials or a contract manufacturer where they’re making tablets or capsules, you are going to have these rooms that are controlled environments. And they’re controlled because they prevent any type of contamination. So they have special air filtration. If the air, the water, everything going pumping into this room to be used is filtered, cleaned. The rooms themselves, the equipment in them have to be cleaned and sanitized. Part of an audit is first to make sure that there are written procedures for cleaning. There are written procedures for taking something apart and cleaning the equipment, cleaning, anything that’s portable like spoons or pans. We also make sure that they have written policies for training all of the employees that are doing this. And then written documentation that the employee did it actually according to the process that was written. So document.

Jesse Allen:

Methodical.

Gordon Fralick:

Document what you’re going to do, document what you’re doing and the document that you did it correctly. And so each of these controlled environments, say it’s some sort of a blending room. And you’ve carefully weighed out these raw materials and you want to make sure that they’re evenly blended. It’s going to be a great, big room and it’s going to have this really cool piece of equipment that’s going to go around and around and around. And before you can bring anything into that room, there’s going to be signage on the outside of the room that tells you this room was cleaned, this room was sanitized, this is who did it. And that’s going to be documented throughout the process. So the room has to be cleaned. that means the walls, the ceiling, the floors, the equipment.

Gordon Fralick:

In this case, it’s a piece of blending equipment. And this has to be done in between everything so you go in and you blend something and you discharge that out and you take it in to be encapsulated. You have to clean it before you bring anything else into that room and everything in there has to be cleaned. This is going to be the same throughout this entire process. If you’re running through an extraction process or if you’re in a facility that’s making tablets or capsules or protein powder. Each step, and let me just run through a few steps. You want to carefully weigh out all of your raw materials. This is done in one room, one set of equipment, set of balances that have to be calibrated by outsourced agencies that come in and make sure your balance is weighing it correctly. This is one room. And then it gets cleaned before and after. Then you have a blending room. This is separate room. It has to be cleaned before and after. You have an encapsulation room, because different types of processing or things that you’re being done requires different equipment.

Gordon Fralick:

And these are big, stainless steel things. Tons, right? So they’re in their own rooms. Each of these rooms, each of these steps has to be cleaned before and after. Cleaned, sanitized.

Jesse Allen:

That’s got to mean the cleaning teams at these operations are pretty substantial, then.

Gordon Fralick:

Oh yeah, yeah. So normally if a facility runs two or three shifts in a day, one of those shifts basically tears the whole building apart and cleans everything out. Right?

Jesse Allen:

So as you’re talking about this, what I’m realizing or at least what I’m imagining and picking up, in the event that there was ever, right. So you get that product. You were talking about it at the very beginning, right? You get the product, you inspect everything, you test it to make sure that the formula that the caps, the tablet itself has everything that it’s supposed to have in it. That it has the right amounts, the right quantities. And it doesn’t have anything that’s not supposed to be in that tablet. And if I understand correctly, you’re able to take, and because of the paperwork and everything done, you could, if you were to discover or find something wrong with the product during that inspection.

Jesse Allen:

Either there’s something in it that shouldn’t be in it or there’s not enough or there’s too much of something, you can track it, trace it all the way back to the individual that made the mistake. And even, it sounds like, the person that signed off on the mistake. I mean it sounds like the documentation is close to that thorough, is that safe to assume?

Gordon Fralick:

Yes. Yeah. So we have to have, it’s called traceability. We have to have traceability going both forward and backwards. So if you handed me a bottle of product, I could look at the packaging, I could look at the lid, I could look at the bottle, I can look at the label and I can find out what the lot number is for that. Who made it, where it came from, when we received it, when it was used in production. I can find out every single material that went into the product. I can tell you who the supplier was. I can tell you which, because we have some redundancy. Take turmeric, for instance. Turmeric is used in curry and culinary. And so we’re competing with a lot of other places that also want turmeric.

Gordon Fralick:

So we have some redundancy in our systems and we have a small handful of turmeric suppliers. Of that bottle, I can tell you exactly who supplied that turmeric and any other material that went in. I can tell you, if it’s in a capsule, I can tell you where the capsule came from.

Ryan Goodwin:

Does that sound…

Ryan Goodwin:

You might even know the names of the workers that were on the floor at the time that they were making that lot? Is it that intensive?

Gordon Fralick:

So, actually, if I opened my wallet, I do keep photographs all of the workers and all the farmers.

Ryan Goodwin:

And carry them with you everywhere you go.

Gordon Fralick:

Right. I send them a Christmas card occasionally.

Gordon Fralick:

Celebrate their birthdays. But the same is also true the opposite. So if there is material coming from France and it ends up in a number of different products, I can look at this one material and I can tell you everywhere it went, every time we used it. And I can even tell you if you hand me a bottle of product, I can run a report and I can tell you everybody who’s a distributor and a customer for LifeVantage who bought that product, so.

Ryan Goodwin:

That is really cool.

Gordon Fralick:

I’m almost omniscient.

Ryan Goodwin:

That’s amazing.

Jesse Allen:

That’s right.

Ryan Goodwin:

That’s incredible.

Jesse Allen:

Omniscient.

Ryan Goodwin:

Almost. Gordon the God.

Jesse Allen:

That’s fascinating. That’s, that’s really, really impressive. And then on top of that, and, well, just as important, that testing that you do, once you receive that finished good, that finished good comes in, you inspect it. Before you actually push that button that you referred to and said release it, you measure the efficacy of the product itself to ensure that what we’re saying about the product, what it actually does, the claims we’re making, you’re measuring the efficacy to ensure that everything that we’re saying about the product is exactly what we’re delivering.

Gordon Fralick:

Yeah,

Ryan Goodwin:

Made to spec.

Jesse Allen:

To the consumer.

Gordon Fralick:

Yes.

Jesse Allen:

And for from what we, what you were saying before, there are certain standards of how often companies are doing that and testing specific products. But you were telling us that we’d take a step beyond. Can you talk more about that?

Gordon Fralick:

Sure. Yeah. So the bottom line is, testing is expensive, right?

Jesse Allen:
Yeah.

Gordon Fralick:

And in addition to that, there’s also a lot of redundancy in our industry. Because Jesse had asked me about scope earlier, and he’s really just talking about personnel and the people involved in it. But if you think about that scope and that there are good manufacturing practices that are required by each person in this supply chain. So a raw material manufacturer is required to do testing, the same things that we’ve been talking about, and they have to demonstrate that it was done properly when they sell it to somebody in the US. Then we buy from this entity in the US, and they have to demonstrate to us. Right?

Ryan Goodwin:

I see what you’re saying.

Gordon Fralick:

Incidentally, the FDA did come in and audit us, so despite what a lot of people will say that we’re an unregulated industry, it’s not true. The FDA came in maybe three years ago and audited us, and all these things that I talk about that we go and do, they did to us. They wanted to see all of our paperwork. They wanted to see that we had our formulas, our specifications-

Ryan Goodwin:

Gordon, how-

Gordon Fralick:

Yes, yes.

Ryan Goodwin:

How omniscient are you actually? That’s what they asked you, and they lowered their register like that when they asked, “Gordon?”

Ryan Goodwin:

Gordon.

Ryan Goodwin:

Because that’s how the FDA speaks.

Gordon Fralick:

Yeah, and then I got my microphone that would expand my voice. I don’t mind telling you, when the FDA comes in, oh, it was terrifying.

Ryan Goodwin:

Yeah. I thank God

Gordon Fralick:

It was scary, but they audited us. They wanted to make sure we were doing our testing, that we had our processes, that we had our training, all the things that I’m talking about. You were asking about testing, and I got off on a tangent. Because testing is expensive-

Jesse Allen:

Oh, hang on.

Gordon Fralick:

Oh?

Jesse Allen:

You can’t leave that there. Right?

Gordon Fralick:

Okay.

Jesse Allen:

The FDA came in and audited us.

Gordon Fralick:

Oh, yeah. It was just this little thing. It was just the FDA. They just knock on the door like this.

Jesse Allen:

And no, I mean what-

Gordon Fralick:

“Hey, Gordon. It’s the FDA. I’m here to check your stuff.”

Jesse Allen:

Yeah. Well, what we really need to know is what were the results of the audit?

Gordon Fralick:

Well, so when the FDA comes to your facility, they either have findings or no findings. We didn’t have any findings.

Jesse Allen:

Congratulations.

Gordon Fralick:

Thank you and-

Ryan Goodwin:

I don’t like findings.

Gordon Fralick:

No, no. They’re good to you. They’ll say, “Hey, we found that you weren’t doing this process correctly, and we have some corrective actions.” They work with you to fix things, but at the same time, all of this is public. You can look up information, and I want an A plus.

Ryan Goodwin:

Yeah.

Gordon Fralick:

Absolutely.

Ryan Goodwin:

Totally. No findings? That’s anticlimactic.

Gordon Fralick:

I know.

Ryan Goodwin:

Want an A plus.

Gordon Fralick:

It’s the same.

Ryan Goodwin:

Basically no findings is an A plus.

Gordon Fralick:

Is an A plus, yes.

Ryan Goodwin:

That’s some bad marketing right there.

Gordon Fralick:

Yeah.

Ryan Goodwin:

FDA needs some marketers.

Gordon Fralick:

Yeah, so they said they’d come back in three years. Maybe in the next six to 12 months, we’ll see them again.

Ryan Goodwin:

Well-

Gordon Fralick:

I would be okay if they waited another year or two or three.

Jesse Allen:

I mean the reality is the amazing thing is, from everything that you’re telling us, you’re prepared and you’re ready and-

Gordon Fralick:

Yeah, but I’m still scared.

Jesse Allen:

Well, that-

Gordon Fralick:

They’re frightening.

Jesse Allen:

That’s normal for that.

Gordon Fralick:

They wear uniforms. They have military uniforms.

Jesse Allen:

Do they really?

Gordon Fralick:

Yes, they do. Oh, yeah-

Jesse Allen:

I was imagining lab coats.

Gordon Fralick:

Military and those hats shape like this. Everybody out there in audio land can see me doing this on top of my head. You know those military hats that are shaped like this?

Jesse Allen:

Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah.

Gordon Fralick:

I don’t know what you call them. Yeah, he had a military hat on. Anyway, yeah, FDA. You still want me to answer the question about testing?

Jesse Allen:

No, we’re great. No, that’s great. What was important is that they came in, they audited, and we passed, no findings.

Gordon Fralick:

Yes.

Jesse Allen:

That’s fantastic. Congratulations.

Gordon Fralick:

Thank you.

Jesse Allen:

Yeah.

Gordon Fralick:

Thank you. Testing.

Ryan Goodwin:

Yeah, and we test every lot.

Gordon Fralick:

We test every lot. Because testing is expensive, the FDA and good manufacturing practices allow you to do statistical sampling for your testing. For instance, if you test your product a number of times and you’ve never had any problems with it, you can then do some sort of skip lot where you’re going every third or fourth or fifth, but also the nature of some materials.

Gordon Fralick:

Say you’re putting in calcium carbonate for a calcium product. Well, calcium carbonate isn’t grown as a plant, and so it’s not going to have pesticides and herbicides and things like that, so you could justify, “Oh, I’m not going to do pesticide testing for this ingredient.” You can actually go through your entire food chain here and say, “I’m going to test this. This’ll be good every 5th time. This will be good every 10th time.”

Gordon Fralick:

We are literally at the end of this food chain. Like I was saying, when we push the button to release it, it goes to the consumer, and so we don’t do any type of statistical sampling. Every lot of product, we do all the testing. I know we keep saying micro and pesticide and heavy metal and active testing, but we do it every time with every lot of product. We just don’t do skip lot testing because we don’t want to take the chance that there could be one fluke that’s going to get through. That’ll never happen with our system.

Ryan Goodwin:

I love that fact because that fact alone should, should tell the end consumer and the distributors what kind of commitment we have to the quality of our products.

Gordon Fralick:

Yeah, absolutely.

Jesse Allen:

Yeah. That’s fantastic. Even though it sounds like, based on our track record, we could. We could follow what other companies are doing and skip test.

Gordon Fralick:

Sure.

Jesse Allen:

But we choose to choose not to and to just one additional step to ensure the quality and the efficacy that we’re delivering to that end consumer.

Gordon Fralick:

Yes.

Jesse Allen:

That’s fantastic. Gordon, thank you. Thanks for taking the time to be with us.

Gordon Fralick:

Thank you.

Jesse Allen:

If there was one other thing… I mean, at the end of day, what we’re really trying to do is help the distributor and the consumer understand just how committed we are to the quality and the integrity and the efficacy of the product. If there is something maybe that we left out or that you feel they need to know… Is there anything else you want to leave with them?

Gordon Fralick:

Yes.

Jesse Allen:

Okay.

Gordon Fralick:

Thank you for asking. By the way that was not prompted, so I wasn’t able to formulate the question before my response, but as you were asking me that, the thought came into my head that I am the vice president of quality assurance and regulatory affairs. I have a vested interest in quality assurance but also in promoting quality assurance.

Gordon Fralick:

In addition to that, to answer your question, what I would like everybody to know is that I and everybody on my teams, we are also consumers. I wonder if people remember that. I’m a consumer. I take these products.

Ryan Goodwin:

Great points.

Gordon Fralick:

I am religious about taking my NRF1, 2, and NAD, and I’m religious about taking the omega, so I am a consumer of these products. I put them into my body. I ingest them also, and so it’s not just reassuring the tens of thousands of people who are our consumers, our distributors and our customers. It’s also the people who report to me but also all of you and everybody else at corporate. We are all consumers of this product, and we want to know that the product is safe. We want to know that it’s effective. My family also is consumers of this product.

Ryan Goodwin:

Yes, they do.

Gordon Fralick:

I love my family.

Jesse Allen:

Yeah, that’s the key point right there.

Gordon Fralick:

I love my wife and kids. They take LifeVantage products also. I’ve never been asked that question, and I’m glad that came to mind because I think sometimes we’re seen as, well, we’re the corporate and we do all these things. While all of those are true, we are also consumers along with every single distributor and customer of LifeVantage.

Jesse Allen:

I think that’s absolutely the important point, that they’re tested with the confidence that you’re comfortable with your family using them. If you’re comfortable with your family using them, certainly comfortable with all the distributors and consumers using them as well, so-

Gordon Fralick:

Yeah, absolutely.

Jesse Allen:

Gordon, thank you so much for joining us today. This was very informative and very helpful and educational as well, so I appreciate it.

Gordon Fralick:

Thank you. It was fun.

Jesse Allen:

Ryan Goodwin, Anything to add?

Ryan Goodwin:

Nope. Love it. Flip that switch, baby.

Jesse Allen:

Flip that switch. Again, Gordon, thank you. We appreciate it. We appreciate everything that you are doing. If I can, I will speak on behalf of the distributors and the consumers. They thank you. I know they do. They’ve mentioned it, perhaps not by name, because I don’t know how many of them know you, but they’re certainly aware of what you are doing and can-

Gordon Fralick:

But I know them.

Jesse Allen:

What you’re doing and what your team is doing, so thank you. Thank you for ensuring that we have, really, a world-class product that we’re able to deliver day in and day out to our consumers. Appreciate it.

Gordon Fralick:

My pleasure.

Jesse Allen:

Thanks. Thanks for everybody joining. We will see you right here next week.

Ryan Goodwin:

But first, don’t forget to write a review. Share this bad dog. Let everybody know about the quality of these products, my friends. See you next week.