NAD is so intimately involved in this energy production, literally every system in our body requires that energy.

Brain Biology with Ryan Goodwin, LifeVantage Chief Marketing Officer, Brian Dixon, PhD, SVP of Research and Development, and Jesse Allen, VP of Marketing and Communications. In today’s episode, we’re talking about the revolutionary Protandim® NAD Synergizer™*. Find out from Brian Dixon what makes this product so revolutionary, when and how to take this product, and finally, the relationship between caffeine and NAD.

Flip the “Caffeine” Switch: Why Caffeine Sensitivity and NAD Synergizer are Correlated Transcript

Jesse Allen:

All right. Welcome to episode number two of Flip the Switch. We’ve got Ryan Goodwin, Chief Marketing Officer for LifeVantage, Dr. Brian Dixon, our Senior Vice President of Research and Development. And I am Jesse Allen, Vice President of Marketing.

Jesse Allen:

So, today we are talking how to take Tri-Synergizer, or more specifically how to take Protandim Tri-Synergizer, right? Our flagship product and system that incorporates, Protandim NRF-1, Protandim NRF-2, and the new Protandim NAD Synergizer.

Ryan Goodwin:

The trifecta.

Jesse Allen:

The trifecta.

Brian Dixon:

The holy trinity.

Jesse Allen:

Yeah. The holy trinity. We were actually working in the department the other day and there was a little bit of a, are we too irreverent to call it the holy trinity? Are we okay to call it the holy trinity? I think we’re solid doing that.

Jesse Allen:

So right. How to take it. Because some people are going to be watching this, some people are going to be listening to it. Some people are actually going to just read the script of what we’re talking about a little bit, but frame it up for us a little bit.

Jesse Allen:

Let’s just step back and frame up NAD Synergizer. What it is, why we love it, why it’s important to us. And then, let’s get into, if I’m brand new to this product or to this system of products, how do I want to use them? And maybe specifically why I want to use them. Fair enough?

Brian Dixon:

Fair enough.

Ryan Goodwin:

Sounds great.

Jesse Allen:

So, Protandim NAD Synergizer, from the view of a scientist, what is it? Why do we care? Why is it important?

Brian Dixon:

Well, Protandim NAD Synergizer is a revolutionary product in the marketplace.

Jesse Allen:

That’s a big word.

Brian Dixon:

It’s revolutionary. And I mean it. And I as a scientist, I don’t throw that word around very often. I came to LifeVantage about eight months ago and just fell in love with this whole notion of nutrigenomics. So, one of the first projects I was handed when I landed at LifeVantage was finishing development on Protandim NAD Synergizer.

Brian Dixon:

And so, as I started looking into exactly what NAD is doing and all the different axes that NAD is working on inside of the cell, I just got unbelievably excited and I got unbelievably excited about it because of this nutrigenomic approach that we were applying to increasing NAD levels, and then what we call all of those downstream effects that occur as a result.

Brian Dixon:

And I was so excited about it, just knowing what I know about biochemical pathways and how they’re working. In chemistry and biochemistry, there’s really two ways to force a reaction to occur. So you can put more of a substrate into this reaction and you can force this biochemistry to occur.

Jesse Allen:

Really quick, tell me what substrate is. What does that mean?

Brian Dixon:

Substrates. So, sorry, maybe we could talk about the raw building blocks. So, think of the cell or any biochemical pathways as being like a little factory. So, you start with the raw materials. They get in through the back door. They go through all the machinery, and then you come up with your finished good or your widget that you’re making.

Jesse Allen:

Okay.

Brian Dixon:

Well, biochemical pathways are working that same way. You start with the raw materials, and those usually come from our diet or from our metabolism. And then, our cells put those raw materials through these biochemical pathways, and then make whatever it needs for the cell or our bodies to function optimally and ultimately survive.

Brian Dixon:

So, you can force these reactions by putting more of that raw material into the system to try to drive the reaction. But at some point, you max out the capacity of these biochemical pathways, so it doesn’t matter how much more raw material you put into that system, it’s going to eventually back up and have no further good to that biochemical pathway.

Brian Dixon:

So, by applying these nutrigenomic-

Ryan Goodwin:

Is that a swamp effect then, too? You put too much raw material in a factory and eventually you can’t even run the machines because the raw material is literally under your feet.

Brian Dixon:

Cools up and rots, exactly like a swamp. Som we can apply these nutrigenomic approaches to increase ultimately the efficiency of that factory. So basically, by going in using various nutrients to flip these switches, to turn on these enzymes or these little machines inside of the cell that in this case are making NAD, we can effectively increase the capacity of that factory.

Brian Dixon:

So, it’s like you have one assembly line, you have too much raw material. It can’t move through the assembly line quick enough. But what if you built a second assembly line? You’ve effectively doubled the production inside of that factory. So, by applying these nutrigenomic approaches, literally what we’re doing is building more of these machines to increase the capacity of the cell, in this case, to make more NAD. It’s an unbelievable approach.

Jesse Allen:

Okay. That’s a really cool explanation and it’s unbelievable to think that that’s even possible. Right? That’s really pretty crazy. So, with the product, the Protandim NAD Synergizer, for all intents and purposes, we’re expanding the production capacity of the cells to produce more NAD. Is that-

Brian Dixon:

Exactly.

Jesse Allen:

Okay. And the alternative, the other approach, is just to put more substrate in but still be limited to that one production line, which eventually the production line can’t produce everything. It can’t use all that raw material and, to what Ryan says, it swamps up-

Ryan Goodwin:

It’s swampy in there. Nobody likes a swamp.

Jesse Allen:

Nobody likes the swamp. Right? Okay. That’s really, really cool. And I would assume that, and we don’t need to hammer on the competitive product or other people’s products, but it sounds like, if I understand correctly, their approach is just put more of that substrate in, just feed more substrate, feed more substrate, but they’re not doing anything to expand the capacity of the cell itself.

Brian Dixon:

That’s so well put. Maybe another analogy I like is one of a funnel. So, you can put as much water into a funnel as you can, but you’re limited by how quickly that water’s going to come out of that funnel by its narrowest point. So, the flow is determined by that narrowest point in the funnel.

Brian Dixon:

It doesn’t matter how much water you put into that funnel, right? You can keep pouring it in. Eventually it’s going to overflow, but only so much can come out there. What we’re really doing is putting additional funnels into the system to increase that capacity.

Jesse Allen:

So, okay. That’s fascinating. Let’s back up for just a minute, because some people that are watching or listening to this are saying, “Okay, I get that. That’s a cool principle. What is NAD? Why do I care? Why do I want more NAD? What is it actually doing?”

Brian Dixon:

NAD is this molecule that’s absolutely essential for life. Okay? And its normal role inside of the cell is to help us take the food that we eat and generate the energy that our bodies need to survive every second of every day. When you start to look at the actual energy flux that’s going through any given cell, much less our entire bodies in any given second, it’s unbelievable.

Brian Dixon:

So, you get this constant turnover of making an energy molecule, and then using that energy molecule to drive some chemical reaction in the body. So, you have to keep repleting, depleting, repleting, depleting. So, you get this massive flux and it’s been estimated that we generate kilograms or pounds of these materials every single day. So, you think about how many molecules does it take to generate pounds or kilograms worth of energy? It’s astronomical. So, literally if you were to shut down your NAD synthesis, you would be dead in a matter of seconds. That’s just how important it is to generate our daily lives.

Jesse Allen:

So, I probably want some is what you’re saying.

Brian Dixon:

You probably want to make sure you maximize your NAD. But there’s been some interesting discoveries that have been made where NAD has these secondary roles, and so are our bodies and our cells are just absolutely amazing. And so, our bodies and our cells have this built-in ability to be able to monitor the status of NAD and basically the energy status of the cell. So, when our energy status hits a certain point, our cells recognize this and then instead of NAD becoming a molecule to help generate energy, it becomes a signaling molecule to turn on other important health mechanisms inside of the cell.

Jesse Allen:

Do you know what I love most about this conversation? I love watching his passion and the excitement that he has talking about this. I think that I can tell you’re passionate about what you’re talking about 

right now and that’s cool.

Brian Dixon:

You’re too kind.

Jesse Allen:

That’s cool.

Ryan Goodwin:

He wakes up in the morning and is like, “Nicotinamide, adenine, dinucleotide. I can’t wait.”

Jesse Allen:

Okay, let me ask you. Okay. So, let’s assume I’m using this product, right? I’ve increased my body’s capacity to produce more NAD.

Ryan Goodwin:

I want to throw something in there.

Jesse Allen:

Okay.

Ryan Goodwin:

And something that a biohacker really cares about is his health span, right? And what we do know is that NAD is declining as we age. And so, it’s super-critical to your body’s function to creating this energy and it’s declining as you age. And typically we just think we’ve got to deal with it, right? Less energy, less focus, less brain function. Memory starts declining. Quality of life just declines day-over-day-over-day.

Ryan Goodwin:

But if you can increase the things that are declining, you can support a healthy aging process, if you will, in your body. And you feel fantastic. You’re going to get better memory, you’re going to get better energy, you’re just to like your life a whole lot better.

Brian Dixon:

It’s funny, all those things that you talked about in, in the aging community, they refer to those as deficits of daily living. So-

Ryan Goodwin:

Deficits of daily living. I love it.

Brian Dixon:

It’s a technical term, I have-

Ryan Goodwin:

It’s alliteration and everything.

Jesse Allen:

I like that term .

Brian Dixon:

It’s this small fade and it happens really slow and you don’t really notice it. But over the course of, let’s say, 10, 30, 40 years, you’re like, “Oh yeah, it is harder to get out of bed. It’s harder to get up the stairs.”

Ryan Goodwin:

And if you do notice it, you’re like, “Well, I’m getting older. Nothing I can do about it. I just got to deal with it.” But what if you don’t have to deal with it?

Jesse Allen:

Just got to accept it.

Brian Dixon:

But all of those things you’re talking about are requiring that energy that we need.

Ryan Goodwin:

Exactly.

Brian Dixon:

So, trying to support that energy production, and then those secondary effects that come from healthy NAD levels is just absolutely critical.

Ryan Goodwin:

So, in the biohacker circles, the NAD molecule is becoming more and more an important thing that people are thinking about trying to maximize so they can support a healthy aging process at the cellular level.

Jesse Allen:

So that was, and I think this interaction answers the question, but if I start using this product, increase my body’s natural NAD production, I have more NAD available, and I don’t know if that’s the right way to say it, that I have more NAD. What am I going to see? What am I going to notice in my daily life? Between not taking it and taking it, what should I expect to see?

Brian Dixon:

I think it’s all the things that Ryan just talked about and because NAD is so intimately involved in this energy production, literally every system in our body requires that energy. So, it can be things from more energy. You talked about mental focus as well. Anything that’s requiring energy you can expect to feel an increase there.

Jesse Allen:

Yeah. You’ve been using the product for probably six months at this point.

Ryan Goodwin:

Way longer than that. What are you talking about? I was like-

Jesse Allen:

Well, I’m trying to think of-

Ryan Goodwin:

Patient zero, right here.

Jesse Allen:

Yeah. Right. Okay. So, we introduced it in October, so okay. Yeah. So it has been, it’s been probably closer to 12 months, roughly, give or take. What’s been the one thing, right? Because I know you use it every day. What’s been the-

Ryan Goodwin:

Can’t live without it.

Jesse Allen:

What’s been the one thing that you’re like, “This is why I have to use this product every day.”?

Ryan Goodwin:

It’s 100% cognitive performance. And the way that I quantify that cognitive performance is nuanced because, like you said, I’ve been taking it for about a year and I’ve been biohacking it a lot longer than that. So, when I first started biohacking, I saw some really big gains in cognitive performance where my word recall got a whole lot better, my memory got a whole lot better. I pretty much killed brain fog.

Ryan Goodwin::

Now I have the flexibility where I can go to Japan, back, and then out to Australia without feeling the same kind of impact that most people do. My circadian rhythm is still changing, but while I’m awake I can still function it at full Ryan capacity.

Ryan Goodwin:

In fact, the very first day though that I took it-

Jesse Allen:

Heaven help us. Heaven help us. Ryan at full Ryan capacity.

Ryan Goodwin:

It’s more nuanced, right? So, if I’m already operating at a 95% of capacity, then I’m looking at smaller increases. But they were small, but they were significant and they happened right away. And when I stop taking it, I miss them right away.

Ryan Goodwin:

So, the very first time I took Protandim NAD Synergizer I took it in the morning with the rest of my stack, probably around six o’clock and, to be honest, I forgot about it. So, by the end of the day, I usually get home some time around six in the evening, and by then I put a lot of effort at work, so I’m feeling pretty cognitively depleted, mentally depleted. I’m not feeling tired per se, but I’m also wanting to just chillax on my couch. I think a lot of people can relate to that.

Ryan Goodwin:

But I’ve got a three year old and I like to be able to get down on the floor and play with her. And typically it’s pretty challenging and my will tends to drag me towards the couch where I can relax for at least a bit, right? But I get home that night and I’m feeling fantastic.

Ryan Goodwin:

So, I get down on the ground, I’m playing with Avery for a few hours, we have dinner, we put her to bed, and then after we put her to bed, I’m still feeling phenomenal. So, I pull out my honey do list and start knocking things out that have been there for months and pretty much get stuff done all the way until I go to bed around 10. And the next day I was like, “Man, what did I do to get that kind of sustained focus productivity?”, if you will.

Ryan Goodwin:

And I was like, “Oh yeah, I took Protandim NAD Synergizer. Phenomenal.” I’ve been able to sustain that impact on my day-to-day over the last year, having taken it.

Jesse Allen:

Dude, a mom or a dad coming home from work, a long day, and be able to sit down and play, and engage, and interact with, with your little kid when you’re home-

Brian Dixon:

Be present with your family.

Jesse Allen:

Dude, who doesn’t want that? That’s really cool.

Ryan Goodwin:

For me, it’s a game changer. Me and my family game changer.

Jesse Allen:

So, with that, did you notice, right, so you’ve got the sustained energy, both physical and just mental energy throughout the day, but then it comes time to go to bed. Any issues there? Have you noticed any issues at all?

Ryan Goodwin:

No. My sleep’s actually been getting better. So I wouldn’t say that I’ve seen issues but I’m getting more deep sleep. My sleep latency, or how long it takes me to fall asleep, is really small.

Jesse Allen:

Yeah.

Ryan Goodwin:

The biggest issue I’ve had is waking up in the middle of the night and this hasn’t impacted any of that. And I’ve done other things that’s pretty much eliminated waking up in the middle of the night too, so now my sleep is rock solid.

Jesse Allen:

Yeah.

Brian Dixon:

You’re talking about sleep. I have an interesting experience with Protandim NAD Energizer and sleep. So, you and I talk, we’re both these insomniacs, right? And we have a hard time. Some nights we get a good night’s sleep, sometimes we don’t.

Jesse Allen:

Ryan said it was his goal this year to help me sleep eight hours at night. So, I just put that out there that-

Ryan Goodwin:

We’re making it happen.

Jesse Allen:

Yeah. Okay.

Ryan Goodwin:

One day at a time.

Brian Dixon:

One day at a time.

Ryan Goodwin:

Actually, one night.

Brian Dixon:

One night at a time. So, I have these issues sleeping and some nights I’ll sleep great but then I’ll go on a stretch of insomnia where I’m not sleeping for three or four nights in a row. You wake up, you look at the clock and I get really grumpy because I know it’s really going to set up my whole day that way.

Ryan Goodwin:

But you can’t stop thinking about NAD.

Brian Dixon:

I can’t stop thinking about NAD. But what I’ve experienced is being able to fall asleep quick like you’re saying, but I’ll now wake up at four or five a.m. and initially I was grumpy. I’m thinking, “This is disturbing my sleep.” So, I roll with it for a couple of days, right? Two, three, four days. I start to notice I don’t have that afternoon crash, come home, have the energy that you’re talking about in the evening.

Brian Dixon:

And then, I started to change my mindset just a little bit and I thought, “If I’m not getting tired, I must be getting the sleep that I need.” So, I feel like I’m sleeping harder-

Ryan Goodwin:

More efficiently.

Brian Dixon:

… I’m up earlier, and instead of feeling like I have to get eight, nine, 10 hours of sleep every night to feel fully rested, and I should say eight or nine or 10 hours in bed trying to rest up and I just get up and I get a few hours back in my day.

Jesse Allen:

That’s incredible.

Brian Dixon:

So, that’s my experience.

Jesse Allen:

That’s really cool. That’s incredible. And I know, I don’t know about you. I know Ryan’s actually tracking that now. He’s got actual data to suggest exactly what you’re talking about. Right? He’s tracking it on his watch and on his ring. And he’s seeing that data of how he’s sleeping, how he’s going through his sleep cycles and getting deeper, better sleep. So that’s, that’s really, really cool.

Brian Dixon:

Yeah, I track mine as well.

Jesse Allen:

Do you?

Brian Dixon:

I love the Garmin ecosystem. I know you love Apple, and I forget the name of the-

Ryan Goodwin:

Yeah, I use auto sleep on my watch and then aura on my ring and then I look at both datasets that both collect overnight and make tweaks.

Brian Dixon:

The data says it.

Ryan Goodwin:

Yeah, I’m a nerd. That’s cool. I’m cool with it. I’m cool with it.

Jesse Allen:

No. You’re a biohacker. It’s cool. All right. So, you mentioned a minute ago and I want to just ask these questions because there’s some people that are watching or listening to this, that they are new to Protandim NAD Synergizer. They’re not using it or they’re getting ready to start using it.

Jesse Allen:

You mentioned your stack, how are you actually using it every day? Where does it come in with meals and other supplements, and all of that? How are you using it? And then, maybe talk to us, recommendations. Because sometimes that gets out there. We want to over-complicate how to actually use products. So, how are you using it?

Ryan Goodwin:

I think it’s important, when you talk about use to think about compliance first. Meaning, taking it consistently. So, we’re talking about supplements, but put into a dose-

Jesse Allen:

That word is important. Compliance, right? Because sometimes, what you’re talking about is consistency.

Ryan Goodwin:

Taking it every day. So, so rule one is making sure that you’re taking it every day, so you’ve got to be able to take it at a time that’s going to make it easier for you to take every day.

Jesse Allen:

Yup.

Ryan Goodwin:

Now, with that being said, for me and for it seems like for most people, the easiest places to put something into a daily routine and create a habit out of it is going to be in the morning. There’s other benefits to taking it in the morning.

Ryan Goodwin:

So, my morning stack, I tend to take pretty close to the time that I’m waking up, somewhere within that 30 minutes of waking up. First and foremost, to make sure that I take it every day. So, Protandim NAD Synergizer, I’m taking the Protandim NRF-2 Synergizer, I’m taking Protandim NRF-1 Synergizer, and Protandim NAD Synergizer. I take them together in a stack every day.

Ryan Goodwin:

And the people at home need to know, most importantly, take it every day. And most likely that’s meaning in the morning. Now, with NAD Synergizer there is a molecule in it that is very similar to caffeine that’s going to use that same receptor. And because of that there’s another reason why you probably want to take it in the morning.

Ryan Goodwin:

In fact, you probably wouldn’t even want to take NAD Synergizer in the afternoon. Especially you have problems with sleep because it just might disrupt your sleep depending on the other things that you’re doing throughout the day.

Brian Dixon:

I’ve got a similar but slightly different routine. So, I like just to have a cup of coffee in the morning, so I like to intermittent fast for at least that morning. Right? So, from dinner the night before in through the coffee. So, I’ll actually take mine at lunch time.

Jesse Allen:

Okay.

Brian Dixon:

So, for me that tends to be my biggest meal. So, I just keep it, it’s my little survival backpack that I take everywhere, so I just keep everything right in my backpack, eat lunch. So, I always make sure to take it with a meal. My stomach can be a little bit sensitive to nutritional supplements.

Brian Dixon:

So, eat lunch and I just know lunchtime supplement time, and just take them every day.

Ryan Goodwin:

I actually like to take it with my fully loaded Axio so that I’ve got some healthy fats in there. It has the same types of things so that I’m not necessarily taking it on an empty stomach, make sure that’s the most bioavailable. And then, it’s not necessarily intermittent fasting, but it’s fasting-like, and then I wait to eat until later in the day.

Ryan Goodwin:

But most importantly is going to be taking it. It’s going to be taking it every day. Whatever you need to do in order to make sure that you’re taking every day, that’s really 90% of the battle.

Jesse Allen:

Okay. Yeah. And that fully loaded Axio, right? That was our previous episode. So, somebody could jump back and see what you’re talking about, how we mix that and make it-

Ryan Goodwin:

That’s a huge part of my routine.

Jesse Allen:

… and why we do it. So, both of you are taking, in effect, the Protandim Tri-Synergizer all together, all three at the same time. I happen to split mine up for no specific reason, but I take Protandim NRF-1 and NRF-2 in the morning, first thing basically. And then I, for whatever reason, have gotten into the habit of, I’ll take Protandim NAD Synergizer at noon with my first meal of the day.

Jesse Allen:

You mentioned a minute ago, caffeine receptors, there’s four… I think we can keep talking about this. There’s four key materials or ingredients in Protandim NAD Synergizer. Maybe walk through those four and then explain to us why we need to understand this relationship with caffeine, and caffeine sensitivity, and caffeine receptors as it relates to the formula of Protandim NAD Synergizer.

Brian Dixon:

Yeah, so let’s start with, we have wasabi root extract in there. The main active ingredients in wasabi root are known as indole 3 carbinols. So, a name that nobody’s probably ever heard of but-

Jesse Allen:

Google it.

Brian Dixon:

Google it. If I can spell it, right?

Ryan Goodwin:

Good luck.

Brian Dixon:

But those compounds and those classes of compounds are notorious for being able to get into the cell, bind the receptors, initiate cell signaling pathways, and ultimately flip these switches on a number of genes. So, a great nutrient gene inducer.

Brian Dixon:

Then we’ve got olive leaf extract in there as well. It’s a great antioxidant, so we’re especially looking for a compound called hydroxytyrosol. So, a lot of great antioxidant properties. But then, also another well-known gene inducer as well.

Brian Dixon:

We’ve got a compound in there called cuprous niacin. It’s a special form, a special complex of copper and basically that B vitamin niacin coupled together. So, when they get into our bodies they split apart. We’ve got a relatively low dose of copper that we’re also providing, right, an essential mineral that our bodies need and a lot of these cell signaling pathways needs.

Brian Dixon:

Copper is at the core of a lot of antioxidant enzymes and detoxification enzymes, for example. And then, the niacin is also working a little bit like some of that substrate, or raw material, to also further help support that NAD production.

Brian Dixon:

And then the last compound in there is this compound called teacrine and it was initially discovered-

Jesse Allen:

So, the way you just explained that, we’re addressing NAD up front with the substrate as well as on the backend, expanding the capacity so we can produce more.

Brian Dixon:

Through that nutrigenomic approach.

Jesse Allen:

Really cool. Okay. Sorry for interrupting.

Brian Dixon:

And then we’ve got teacrine. Teacrine is a really interesting compound and it was initially discovered in a tea leaf and actually I believe it lives in two separate tea species.

Brian Dixon:

It’s not that tea that we’re mostly familiar with like camilia sinensis. It’s these different species of tea. It turns out it’s found in relatively low concentrations. When you look at the molecular structures of teacrine and caffeine, they’re actually very, very similar.

Brian Dixon:

In a lot of ways, caffeine gets a bad rap as being an unhealthy molecule, but there is no more psychoactive drug that’s consumed on the face of this earth than caffeine. It has an amazing safety profile. It’s an amazing antioxidant but it also can work nutrigenomically by binding receptors and helping our physiology gear toward a more healthy approach.

Brian Dixon:

Teacrine caught the attention of the initial discovers because it was related, still binding the same receptors that caffeine is binding, but it didn’t have a lot of the side effects that caffeine was having. So, the habituation. You hear about people that drink coffee constantly and then if they ever miss a day, they have a massive headache.

Brian Dixon:

So you literally get addicted-

Jesse Allen:

Withdrawals.

Brian Dixon:

… to caffeine. So, it doesn’t have the habituation effect. You also don’t get the jitters that can come. For me, especially if I’m drinking a lot of caffeine on an empty stomach, I can get shaky and a little jittery, so it doesn’t have those side effects, if you will.

Brian Dixon:

And the initial research on teacrine was done from a therapeutic role. So, they were looking at some therapeutic targets that teacrine could target. So, fast forward, you’ve got a compound that’s a lot like caffeine, binding the same receptors but without the side effects.

Brian Dixon:

So in a lot of ways, far superior to caffeine. It has even a far higher safety window than caffeine. I believe it’s about three times more safe than caffeine alone. It’s just-

Jesse Allen:

Which caffeine, in and of itself, is already extremely safe.

Brian Dixon:

Yeah. This massive worldwide experiment that’s been going on for thousands of years. Right?

Jesse Allen:

Thousands of years. Yeah.

Brian Dixon:

It’s funny, you can look up deaths from caffeine and there’s only been just a very small handful of deaths that have been documented to caffeine. And there were probably suicide attempts from taking those caffeine pills that were so popular back in, probably the ’90s.

Brian Dixon:

So anyway, so now we’ve got this compound that is going to help with some cell signaling. It’s going to also help with the gene induction as well. And then, we can also leverage those benefits of binding to the adenine receptor. That same receptor that caffeine is binding to, especially for mental clarity.

Brian Dixon:

There’s a lot of data out there on sports performance as well. So just an amazing compound.

Jesse Allen:

Okay. Really, really impressive. Really cool. If I’m brand new, I’m just starting to use the product now, knowing what you’ve just explained about these receptors and that teacrine, the teacrine molecule is binding to these receptors, anything that I need to be aware of or pay attention to as I start to use the product?

Jesse Allen:

Do I jump head first? Do I dip my toe? What do you recommend? How should I approach this?

Brian Dixon:

It’s hard to come up with a blanket recommendation, right? We’re all individuals. We all behave with nutrients. I mean, think about your diet for example, right? Some people that are gluten intolerant, some people can’t have dairy, right? Soy, whatever it might be.

Brian Dixon:

So, we’re all individuals and we’re all going to react differently. The two things I would suggest people do is always take these products with a meal, that helps with the buffering. It will also slow down the absorption just a little bit as it’s getting into our bloodstream.

Brian Dixon:

And then I would also, in the case of Protandim NAD Synergizer also think about the other caffeine consumption that you’re having throughout the day. So for me, for example, I like to spread it apart. So, I have one cup of coffee in the morning. I don’t take my Tri-Synergizer then, I wait until lunch. So, I’ve separated out my caffeine intake from my Protandim NAD Synergizer intake.

Brian Dixon:

The only other population that probably needs to be sensitive about whether or not they can take Protandim NAD Synergizer are people that have high blood pressure or other heart conditions outside of that. Again, coming back and leaning on that wealth of data that’s out there around caffeine. Outside of those two or three circumstances, I don’t know that there’s really anything to be so concerned about.

Jesse Allen:

Yeah. Great.

Ryan Goodwin:

Yeah. There’s a couple of points I’d like to make.

Jesse Allen:

Yeah.

Ryan Goodwin:

The definition of biohacking is taking control of your own biology, and I believe that the most important words in that statement are your own. Just like Brian said, everybody’s bodies works individually. So, a biohacker understands that we’re going to be listening to other people’s experiences to give us some signal on something that may or may not work for us.

Ryan Goodwin:

And obviously, the wider net it casts or the bigger population it seems to be helping is a stronger signal that it just might work for us. But a biohacker always understands that we’ve got to figure out what works best for us. That’s why, number one, taking it every day is the most important thing. But then, number two, you’re paying attention to your body, listening to your body, and your body’s going to tell you the way that you should be taking it.

Ryan Goodwin:

So, if you do have a caffeine sensitivity, you’ve got to be careful with caffeine already, right? So, considering that NAD Synergizer has a molecule in there that’s very similar to caffeine, that can tell you that maybe you want to take, the dose is two pills. You could try out with one and listen to your body, and also be careful with other caffeine that you’re drinking. Right?

Ryan Goodwin:

So, if you have an extreme caffeine sensitivity, a great place to start is take one NAD Synergizer, avoid caffeine, and see how you feel. Most people are going to feel great. Then they can try two with no caffeine, make sure that they’re still feeling great.

Jesse Allen:

How long would you say to just use one pill a day, and then introduce the second? A week? A couple of weeks? What would you recommend?

Ryan Goodwin:

I think just a few days is probably long enough, three or four days, to give you an idea of how your body’s going to be responding.

Jesse Allen:

Okay.

Ryan Goodwin:

I also like to try to keep things simple, right? Because, for me, it’s not that I’m lazy, but it’s just hard to get some momentum going and consistency and creating new habits. So I like to try to figure things out pretty quickly. Plus I’ve gotten to learn to listen to my body. It wasn’t as easy as before.

Ryan Goodwin:

But if you do have a caffeine sensitivity, you probably know what types of things you’re looking for. If it’s starting to feel like you’re getting too much caffeine, from the data that we’ve been seeing, the real thing you’ve got to be considering is your overall caffeine consumption, that if you’re going to be taking NAD Synergizer or teacrine without caffeine, it’s not reacting the same way as caffeine, but it can increase the effect of caffeine.

Ryan Goodwin:

So, if you have a caffeine sensitivity and you’re just going to town on your caffeine and you’re willy-nilly with the timing of when you’re drinking your caffeine and when you’re taking the Tri-Synergizer, you just might get more of a caffeine response than you were anticipating.

Ryan Goodwin:

So, it’s an individual type of thing. What’s funny is I actually have the snip that would tell me that I should have a caffeine sensitivity, but it must not be turned on because it’s really hard for me to really sense that cognitive benefit that most people feel right away to say, “Oh, I feel more alert, more awake.” I don’t really have those things. I’ll take it, and the benefit that I really see ends up being long after I’ve taken it, in the afternoons and evenings when I’m taking it in the morning.

Jesse Allen:

Got it. Got it. Great example of just personal experience, and I love how you’re talking about, at the end of the day, it’s all very personal, right?

Ryan Goodwin:

It’s 100% person.

Jesse Allen:

Yeah. Right? Follow best practices or learn from what others have doing, but pay attention to yourself.

Ryan Goodwin:

Yeah. And that’s going to be the case for everything that you’re taking.

Jesse Allen:

Yeah. Which it really should be. Right? Yeah, for sure. All right, great conversation. We talk about the various benefits and all the great things that are associated with Protandim NAD Synergizer. I don’t know about you guys, but as I listen to you talk about it, the one thing that at least resonates with me is, is the experience that you’ve had with your family, with work, that it’s helping you just be more present at work, helping you with the colleagues and the peers and your employees.

Jesse Allen:

But probably most important, at least for me, thinking about it, how it allows you to be more present with that little Avery when you get home. That is so cool. So cool. A product that allows you to deepen and better those relationships with the people you love is a product that I think absolutely everybody wants.

Jesse Allen:

So, great conversation. In a couple of episodes, I think we’ve got a couple episodes from now, we’re actually going to dive into more information around the Protandim Tri-Synergizer. Everything today was primarily focused around a Protandim NAD, which is exactly where we should have been and what we should have been talking about.

Jesse Allen:

And so, in the next couple of weeks we’ll talk Protandim Tri-Synergizer and how the other two products in the Protandim family synergistically relate and interact with the Protandim NAD Synergizer.

Ryan Goodwin:

One of my favorite topics.

Brian Dixon:

We’ll talk about that amazing data that we’ve got.

Ryan Goodwin:

Yeah.

Brian Dixon:

We can even touch on the patent as well that we’ve submitted.

Jesse Allen:

Very, very cool. Very exciting. So anyways, any last thing you want to say about the product or what we’ve been talking about today?

Brian Dixon:

Well, I think you teased it enough. I mean, tune back in in a couple of weeks and we’ll take a deep dive into this amazing data that we’ve been able to achieve, both ourselves, and then with our strategic partners. And how that was the impetus for this massive patent that we’re able to file as well.

Jesse Allen:

Very cool. Dr. Biohacker, anything from you?

Ryan Goodwin:

You can’t call me a doctor, but I’ll consider myself one. I just want to say that, that every human has more potential than they know and LifeVantage is here to apply nutrigenomics to unlock that potential. And that’s why I absolutely love Protandim NAD Synergizer. That’s why I absolutely love the work that we get to do, and that’s why I absolutely love this entire conversation.

Ryan Goodwin:

We can literally help the individual unlock that potential that they have hidden in there so that they can accomplish whatever it is that they’re trying to do in this great wide world of ours.

Jesse Allen:

Very cool. Perfect. Thank you. And thanks for joining us on Flip the Switch and we’ll see you right back here next week.

If you have questions about whether or not (LifeVantage Product) is a product you can take, consult with your healthcare provider.

The views expressed in this podcast are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of LifeVantage or any other agency, organization, employer or company.

The employee product experiences shared in this podcast are unique to the individual sharing his or her experience and are not a guarantee that any consumer will experience the same product results or benefits.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.